[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

An age old question that really doesn’t present an accurate inquiry in and of itself. Are we talking about running like jogging, or running like sprinting? Are we talking about skating like coasting, or skating like sprinting? In any event, let’s attempt to address the question based less on assumption and moreso upon the kinetic realities as it pertains to the sport of hockey. Regardless, we at Massi-Machado Strength & Conditioning, LLC would like to provoke some reader thought regarding the subject.

I am persistently presented with the argument that skating provides a higher degree of gained momentum and lesser incidence of lost momentum then running. Yet, I don’t think that this statement presents with enough of a control to be quantifiable. Now albeit there is a particular degree of glide associated with skating, there is also continued momentum associated with dry-land sprinting. Otherwise, there would be no incidence of injury associated to deceleration in dry-land sprinting and/or agility. Obviously there is a considerable degree of momentum production to be concerned with in both venues. For example; sprint on land with all of your might for forty yards, then suddenly stop moving your feet. Guess what? Momentum will cause you to fall on your face and then roll for a bit. Now sprint that same forty dry-land yards again then decelerate appropriately, and you’ll quickly realize that there is plenty of momentum to contend with in your deceleration. I further argue that one should imagine that the forces generated and transferred from the same kinetic chain associated to dry-land sprinting not only has to land squarely onto that of the ball and toes of the foot, yet requires to be “reprocessed” for a more concentrated force translation onto that of a blade that measures only millimeters in width. All of which demands particular balance in the interim, thereby further magnifying the efforts required for agility, transition and deceleration on skates. These thoughts in and of themselves should qualify skating as the more demanding movement exercise, yet let’s examine the interrelation (or lack thereof) associated with ice hockey and the typical field sport during frames of game play.

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

QUICK FACT: We are inherently more adaptable to the patterns associated with dry land movement as we spend more time walking and/or running then we do skating. (Unless of course you were raised in Canada. – God Bless you all!)

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/fusion_imageframe][fusion_text]

NHL players drag weighted sleds during a dry-land session of the Biosteel #CAMP at St. Michael’s College inToronto on Aug. 19, 2013. (Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

I am often accused of over complicating and creating complexities associated with sprinting, agility and all things speed related. Yet, I argue that it is not he/she who puts the most force into the ground (or ice) that is fastest. RATHER – he/she who puts the most force into the ground, efficiently and at the highest rate of exchange while moving in a given direction is the fastest. Above and beyond the aforesaid, lies the concept and goal of attaining a slower rate of negative force dissipation, while achieving a higher rate of positive force dispersion. (Now I’m even confusing myself) You see; you want that force to remain as long as you wish to harness it (even though it’s a fraction of a second) then explosively translate into the nuances of the blade’s stroke and stride as to propel the skater in any given direction, while maintaining the ability to put the brakes on and transition at a moment’s notice.

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/fusion_imageframe][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Certainly, there are some common denominators found in both skating and running (sprinting) such as; the importance of the ball and big toe of the foot, musculoskeletal components of the lower extremities found in the hips (pelvic region), quads, hamstrings, calves and ankles, as they drive in conjunction with a powerful trunk-torso. Additionally, there is a particular drive we focus upon that we refer to as the “gluteal chain”, as it pertains to the pelvic/hip cycle and it’s actuation that is similar in both, yet more unique in its requirement for skating as compared to that of dry-land sprinting. However, that is where the similarities may cease. You see, most on dry land will have a degree of normal and complimentary elbow and shoulder girdle drive to assist in both the speed and agility elements of a given game. Now, put a stick in your hand that could require action in the blink of an eye, and you now have the element of decreased complimentary elbow drive. Therefore, the elbow drive normally associated with speed and agility, is now all but removed in the interest of controlling puck-play. Henceforth, we see my theory of elevated kinetic requirement for ice hockey come into play. With this absolute elbow and shoulder drive removed, the skater will now become highly reliant upon the independent utilization of the lower kinetic and gluteal chain along with its proper “firing order” to offset the loss of complimentary upper body drive.

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_text]

In general, form fixes, ground contact, stride length and rate of exchange along with proper strength and power training will associate to great gains in speed and agility on land. However, in ice hockey we are also faced with examining the additional dynamics of blade radius, blade length, sharpening hollows, skating form and stride, as well as dissociating underutilization and thereby associating proper utilization of blade length for maximal ice contact. You see, in ice hockey the foot itself still exists as the point of transference by which to bridge the contact gap to the surface medium of ice thru the blade, while concentration for speed is still focused onto the ball and big toe of the foot. Part-and-parcel to these considerations is also that powerful and explosive agility relies on an artfully orchestrated series of infinite transitions, begging complete cooperation of the whole foot and arch thereof for synergistic participation. Surely ice hockey skating possesses a set of unique requirements not thoroughly associated to that of dry-land sprinting, and demands the proper attention and respect as it pertains to being just one part of a beautiful sport that requires a vast and complex competitive skill set.

Food for thought: Would the availability of the upper extremities as counter balances and “rudders” coupled with the rotational torsion found in figure skating assist in ease of movement, or be cancelled out by the elevated power requirement found necessary to perform and recover from complex maneuvers? Could it be the most demanding sport of all?

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

LAISSER UN COMMENTAIRE

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here